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Discussion Starter #1
I deliberated for a while,but since I hope to keep this bike for a long time,I decided to go the cartridge route with my forks.

A place in England SSR Suspension are doing the work. https://www.ssr-suspension.uk IDS K-Tech

So,forks are out and were collected yesterday. I'll post more updates as they happen. There'll not be much in the way of a road test until Spring when all the salt is washed off the roads. The waiting will be the hardest part! The calipers and all those 'hard to get at places' are all well cleaned in the meantime! :cool:

 

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you are brave to support your bike in a car jack.. 馃ぃ I used a headstock stand.

Funny you should post this right now, I'm literally about leave the house to go pick my forks up from GP Suspension from getting the same K-Tech IDS25's installed in them. I was going to do it myself, but after a bit of investigation I saw that the fork bottoms (the cast part that holds the caliper) need to be unscrewed from the chrome fork stanchion tube and for that you need a 41mm collet vice which I didn't really want to spend $80 on for a single use, and GP Suspension offered to do the install for $150 which I thought was a phenomenal price.

What spring rate did you end up going with? I asked K-Tech to send me 0.925 kg/mm springs which is what I had in my RaceTech forks previous and liked, but for some reason K-Tech sent me 9.5 N/mm (which equates to roughly 0.97 kg/mm). Maybe they know better based on the paraments I told them, hopefully it's not going to be overly stiff.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ha! The jack has added support not seen in the pic,just in case it loses pressure!

We haven't discussed spring rate just yet,but will do shortly. I'm 80kgs (176 lbs) fully kitted up,but I won't be tracking the bike,so perhaps I'll get away with a lighter spring.
 

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Oooooohhh... I'm thinking of some nitron cartridges... Be really interested to see how it goes...

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

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I just finished popping the forks back in the bike. I set the fork height to be pretty much flush with the caps. For some reason the 4th gen forks are about 10-15mm shorter than the 3rd gen forks, in fact the entire bike is between 0.5" to nearly 1" lower (front and rear respectively) as compared to the 3rd gen even though they are essentially the same bike. No wonder reviewers in the period were complaining about ground clearance on the 4th gen. I have no idea why Kawasaki did this, maybe to make the seat height more beginner friendly? If you want your geometry to be closer to a true sport bike and steer quicker, I suggest you pick up 3rd gen rear linkages and install them in your 4th gen. It will lift the bike up by about 20mm in the rear and have the same geometry as a 3rd gen.

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Also just saw that they came with lovely fork travel indicators too!
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here's the box of parts that I got back, it confirm that the left fork leg of the Showa SFF-BP forks is a complete dud, doesnt do anything other than suspend the bike, no valving/damping what so ever.
85315


Here's the headstock lift that I used. $30 at the local chinese crap-ware market

85316
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just finished popping the forks back in the bike. I set the fork height to be pretty much flush with the caps. For some reason the 4th gen forks are about 10-15mm shorter than the 3rd gen forks, in fact the entire bike is between 0.5" to nearly 1" lower (front and rear respectively) as compared to the 3rd gen even though they are essentially the same bike. No wonder reviewers in the period were complaining about ground clearance on the 4th gen. I have no idea why Kawasaki did this, maybe to make the seat height more beginner friendly? If you want your geometry to be closer to a true sport bike and steer quicker, I suggest you pick up 3rd gen rear linkages and install them in your 4th gen. It will lift the bike up by about 20mm in the rear and have the same geometry as a 3rd gen.
Cool info Ungarisch,ta.

What linkage parts from the 3rd gen are needed for the mod?
 

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Not really a mod, just using different linkages to bring the bike back to a more sporty steering geometry, swingarm angle and added ground clearance.
Using these 2 parts: Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ZX1000 & Z1000 Rear Suspension Shock Absorber Linkage Arms | eBay

Here is the comparison between the 3rd gen and 4th gen linkage. The shorter dogbone and longer triangulated plate is the 4th gen linkage, the other is the 3rd gen.
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Here is a quick and dirty CAD calculation I made as to how mixing the dogbone and/or triangulated plate affects ride height and swingarm angle (in relation to the frame, not in relation to the ground). The pieces marked '10 are the 3rd gen and the pieces marked '14 are the 4th gen. As you can see, when you add the 4th gen linkages to a 3rd gen bike you get a negative 2* degrees of swingarm angle, which equates to roughly 20-22mm of ride height decrease (as measured from the rear axle to the subframe). If you do the inverse, as in put 3rd gen linkages on a 4th gen you get the opposite effect, you gain 2* degrees / 22mm. Also if you mix and match the 3rd and 4th gen linkage and dogbone you get the effects listed below, but also consider your bike is already 2* degrees / 22mm lower, so take that into account.

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Discussion Starter #8
Awesome. Are the gen3 and 4 bolts all interchangeable? Is that years up until 2013?

I remember that post from a while back,but as usual had forgotten all about it. Cheers man.
 

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Awesome. Are the gen3 and 4 bolts all interchangeable? Is that years up until 2013?

I remember that post from a while back,but as usual had forgotten all about it. Cheers man.
Yeah, bolts are the same, the two bikes are virtually identical in terms of frame and swingarm. The difference between a 3rd and 4th gen is purely cosmetical, besides the aforementioned geometry changes. Interestingly the Ninja 1000, which again is the same bike, did not get this lowered ride height linkage that the 4th gen got, it still uses the 3rd gen linkage which provide higher ride height. Perhaps Kawasaki considers that bike more sporty than the Z1000.

If you don't have clearance issues, and happy with your bike's handling, then it's probably not really all that beneficial to you, especially if you prefer stability over quick steering, but for $20 in parts it's worth a try if you like to tinker.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, bolts are the same, the two bikes are virtually identical in terms of frame and swingarm. The difference between a 3rd and 4th gen is purely cosmetical, besides the aforementioned geometry changes. Interestingly the Ninja 1000, which again is the same bike, did not get this lowered ride height linkage that the 4th gen got, it still uses the 3rd gen linkage which provide higher ride height. Perhaps Kawasaki considers that bike more sporty than the Z1000.

If you don't have clearance issues, and happy with your bike's handling, then it's probably not really all that beneficial to you, especially if you prefer stability over quick steering, but for $20 in parts it's worth a try if you like to tinker.
It's all info and creates choice. Who knows what I'll want to change down the road. It's a cheap way to experiment.
 

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I found another place doing jackup kits. The just use the sideplates in varying lengths to raise the rear from 25mm to 45mm,depending on needs. I don't think I'd be going beyond 25mm for the road.

https://www.bikefarmmv.com/epages/79512538.mobile/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/79512538/Products/"HHLRKA%20Z%201000%2014-"&fbclid=IwAR0alYZgtf0WMfakyS9KvWGMMr1HKnRHOFvlZGbTdMV2drasZbWbAKqQ_qY
I would be carefully with those. These aftermarket linkages look to be only the triangulated plate (without a different length dog bone) and that can not only raise the ride height but also change the pivot ratio causing different leverages on your shock which would alter your effective spring and damping force, you don't want to mess with that. I would stick with the OEM linkage package as that compensates for the shorter linkage ratio change via a longer dogbone, retaining your shocks original travel rate.

Also, I just came back from a trackday yesterday with the new K-Tech's installed, video to come soon. At first I thought this feel about the same as the BPF forks, then the following lap I hit a clear track without traffic so I pushed it on a bit thinking to myself that this feels pretty damn good actually... I came into the pits, looked down at my lap timer and to my absolute shock I did a 2:10! That's just under 2 seconds faster than my previous fastest laps for December and seriously respectable for being on street tires (Michelin Power Cup2's) and not being a full on supersport bike! As soon as my OZ wheels come in, I'm going to put a set of slicks on the OEM wheels with tire warmers and see how I can improve with that.

With some select mods, we can turn this fat pig of a Z1000 into competent sporting machine!

85327
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't know if you ride on the road much Ungarisch,but I'd love to know if the forks can deal with roads without feeling harsh and uncompliant.
 

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I don't know if you ride on the road much Ungarisch,but I'd love to know if the forks can deal with roads without feeling harsh and uncompliant.
After I installed it, I did take it on a 5 miles ride on the road to have all of the oil settle back down to the fork bottom and regian damping ability. Better do that at low speeds on the streets than go hit the track and realize the first corner you got zero damping, lol. The best that I can describe my short ride on the street was that it was plush while at the same time also very supportive. We have terrible roads here in Los Angeles, not potholes ridden but just shitty concrete slabs segments instead of smooth asphalt, which is very jarring to ride on as you feel all the gaps where they join. I was surprised how well it floated over them.

To be honest, I've run both the standard 3rd gen Showa 41mm USD forks (both stock and full RaceTech GoldValve build) and the 4th gen Showa SFF-BP forks. On the street, the BP forks were miles more comfortable than the original 3rd gen forks. Going from the 3rd gen forks to the K-Tech's would have been a massive difference in regards to comfort, while going from the 4th gen BP forks to the K-Techs, there definitely is a difference in comfort but not astronomical. The bigger difference is support and accurate damping ability. The BP's were very "dive-y", and mid corner was a bit "pogo-y", and even if you added a bit of rebound and compression they then felt stiff and if they weren't damping the road undulation properly. The K-Tech completely fixes that, the dive is gone, and mid corner at high lean you cannot feel the suspension working underneath you through the bars, which is exactly what it should be doing. I don't mean there is no feal, it's more like the handlebars are not affected by suspension movement. My confidence in trail braking deep into corners went up a massive amount, hence why my lap times came down by a relatively large margin. I'm not sure how/if that would translate into the street riding, but that was the biggest difference I noticed, and I'm extremely happy with the results.

I too am 170lbs, though without gear, and the 9.5NM spring felt perfect on the street, not harsh at all, very plush, while at the track the stroke indicator ring still had about 18mm of gap from bottoming out. Even after some extreme braking when a slower rider cut over in front of me last second before corner entry with 20mph speed delta between us, and having to go into full panic braking, floating the rear wheel. I was very surprised that the stroke indicator still showed 18mm of fork travel left (13mm actual, as there is probably a 5mm bottoming stop) . I might take a few 1 or 2 more turns of preload out of the forks when I go to tracks with really bad road surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That's all very reassuring to read.
With the stock forks I was always looking for that compromise between comfort and sweet handling. Even at soft settings the forks felt harsh,then with more spirited riding they were vague and bottomed out easily. When I set them stiffer they worked better for sportier riding,but were harsh and no compliancy during slower riding.

I'll be very pleased if I get similar feedback when I try out my own.

Thanks a lot for your input Ungarisch.
 

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you are brave to support your bike in a car jack.. 馃ぃ I used a headstock stand.

Funny you should post this right now, I'm literally about leave the house to go pick my forks up from GP Suspension from getting the same K-Tech IDS25's installed in them. I was going to do it myself, but after a bit of investigation I saw that the fork bottoms (the cast part that holds the caliper) need to be unscrewed from the chrome fork stanchion tube and for that you need a 41mm collet vice which I didn't really want to spend $80 on for a single use, and GP Suspension offered to do the install for $150 which I thought was a phenomenal price.

What spring rate did you end up going with? I asked K-Tech to send me 0.925 kg/mm springs which is what I had in my RaceTech forks previous and liked, but for some reason K-Tech sent me 9.5 N/mm (which equates to roughly 0.97 kg/mm). Maybe they know better based on the paraments I told them, hopefully it's not going to be overly stiff.
what do you have for the rear suspension?
 

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I have the Yacugar 3-way adjustable (rebound with high and low speed compression) shock, with remote reservoir and remote preload hydraulic adjuster, which I recently discovered comes with a progressive spring installed, instead of linear. Progressive springs are great for road riding, but not very good or predictable for more advanced or track riding. I am changing out the spring to a Wilbers linear rate spring, though my suspension guy now needs to figure out what spring rate to use based on the current progressive spring's compression rate per both static and rider sag, and the bike's linkage ratio for said travel, which is not easy to do. If you plan on doing track riding, avoid getting Yacugar, Hyperpro or TracTive shocks, as those all come with progressive springs. Instead use Nitron, Wilbers or if you can, import the 3-way adjustable Penske shock from the US. This is what I wish I would have gotten had I known better. Unfortunately K-Tech does not make a shock for our bikes, and the Ohlins STX isn't fully adjustable.

Here's my Yacugar. I chose this over the Wilbers and Nitron because it was all black. That was a stupid mistake, dont even buy shocks based on what color they are. Just like don't buy forks because they are gold color. 馃ぃ 馃槀馃槅馃槃馃お
85414
 

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I have the Yacugar 3-way adjustable (rebound with high and low speed compression) shock, with remote reservoir and remote preload hydraulic adjuster, which I recently discovered comes with a progressive spring installed, instead of linear. Progressive springs are great for road riding, but not very good or predictable for more advanced or track riding. I am changing out the spring to a Wilbers linear rate spring, though my suspension guy now needs to figure out what spring rate to use based on the current progressive spring's compression rate per both static and rider sag, and the bike's linkage ratio for said travel, which is not easy to do. If you plan on doing track riding, avoid getting Yacugar, Hyperpro or TracTive shocks, as those all come with progressive springs. Instead use Nitron, Wilbers or if you can, import the 3-way adjustable Penske shock from the US. This is what I wish I would have gotten had I known better. Unfortunately K-Tech does not make a shock for our bikes, and the Ohlins STX isn't fully adjustable.

Here's my Yacugar. I chose this over the Wilbers and Nitron because it was all black. That was a stupid mistake, dont even buy shocks based on what color they are. Just like don't buy forks because they are gold color. 馃ぃ 馃槀馃槅馃槃馃お
View attachment 85414
The k-tech is making a shock for the 4:th generation z1000 as we speak.
The used my bike to take all the info and is going to release it this summer馃槈
 
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