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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, new to this forum. Real Z enthusiasts.
I am upgrading lots of things on my 2010 non abs nd I have lots of questions in regards to gear box, front fork, braking system etc...

1. Front forks: I will install Showa balance free front suspension from zx10r 2016 on my Z.
Q1: Will the tubes fit in the Z clamps or do I need to get zx10r 2016 clamps?
Q2: if I need to change the clamps will my Renthal handle bar and Hyperpro steering damper be compromised?

2. Gear box:
Q1: What kind of change I need to do to make the gear box less "clunky" When shifting? (All ready have quick shifter install which is really amazing to play with but the rest of the time (when riding smooth) the gear box feels like non lubricated mechanics that need attention.

This is my first post ever, very grateful for any pointers :)
refrain from telling me the obvious (it's expensive upgrades black black...)
This is a dream project from a very long time ago and I am doing it :)

Pics to come soon!

Cheers!
 

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congrats on your project brother! lot of good info and peeps in this forum. if you haven’t already found it, see the link below for the service manuals. as far as the gear box being “clunky”, i’ve found that true of all the kawasaki’s i’ve ridden. i always thought they kept it that way as a source of feedback to the rider. letting you know what the gear box is doing. letting you know the selector has moved the gear into the correct position when the motor is running. i can definitely tell on my gen 4 when i put it into first gear. the whole bike jolts for a second.

 

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You can do a few things to help with the gear change. Make sure the gear lever is adjusted to give you a positive shift,no slack in the linkage and keep the final drive chain and clutch cable well adjusted.

I've always found Kawasaki gearboxes to perform best at higher revs using clutchless shifts for going up the box. For low speed stuff using the clutch you just have to be deliberate and make positive changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
congrats on your project brother! lot of good info and peeps in this forum. if you haven’t already found it, see the link below for the service manuals. as far as the gear box being “clunky”, i’ve found that true of all the kawasaki’s i’ve ridden. i always thought they kept it that way as a source of feedback to the rider. letting you know what the gear box is doing. letting you know the selector has moved the gear into the correct position when the motor is running. i can definitely tell on my gen 4 when i put it into first gear. the whole bike jolts for a second.

Thanks! this manual should help :)
 

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The zx10r or zx6r forks will not fit the 3rd gen Z lower triple without custom machining. While the upper on all Kawi's is a 50mm bore, on the 3rd gen the lower is 52mm while on the zx10, zx6 and 4th gen Z it's 53mm. You can either upgrade to a 4th gen Z lower triple (but then your headlights no longer fit), or you can do as I did and machine out the 3rd gen Z lower clamp to 53mm. You need to have a very talented machinist with preferably a 5-axis CNC in order to get this right.
The BFF forks are 53mm
85720


while the lower clamp is 52mm
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Here is what mine looked like after machining. Since your only removing 0.5mm of material from the bore, I really doubt the structural integrity is compromised.

85719


After you've done that, you're going to have to design a custom fender mount adapter since the mounting locations on the 3rd gen Z is unlike any other Kawasaki due to the full fairing forks
85723

85722


But once you're done, you've got lots of options for cartidge kits, I went with K-Tech
85724
 

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what’s the latest opinion on the k-tech ungarish? are they plush? are they next level better then the stock gen 4 forks? i’m still considering upgrading at some point. did you notice a difference in ride quality after you installed the light weight/low inertia wheels?
 

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what’s the latest opinion on the k-tech ungarish? are they plush? are they next level better then the stock gen 4 forks? i’m still considering upgrading at some point. did you notice a difference in ride quality after you installed the light weight/low inertia wheels?
In the canyons and at the track it's absolutely great, dialed in perfectly for me, everything I wanted out of it. However, I took the bike to downtown last month just because I needed to be back home in time to pick up my dog from surgery, normally I always commute with car but this time I had to use the bike, and my impressions were the complete opposite. Over the broken pavements of Downtown LA street it was terrible, ass-pounding, teeth rattling, just plain uncomfortable. Perhaps that's largely due to recently upgrading to a stiffer and linear rear shock spring, and probably also because it's valved for my specific needs rather than just a general street comfort setting. Regardless, I'm not too bothered. It works wonderfully where I need it...

guess it's just a lesson that buying fancy suspension isn't necessarily a benefit, unless it's specifically dialed in for your use case.
 

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In the canyons and at the track it's absolutely great, dialed in perfectly for me, everything I wanted out of it. However, I took the bike to downtown last month just because I needed to be back home in time to pick up my dog from surgery, normally I always commute with car but this time I had to use the bike, and my impressions were the complete opposite. Over the broken pavements of Downtown LA street it was terrible, ass-pounding, teeth rattling, just plain uncomfortable. Perhaps that's largely due to recently upgrading to a stiffer and linear rear shock spring, and probably also because it's valved for my specific needs rather than just a general street comfort setting. Regardless, I'm not too bothered. It works wonderfully where I need it...

guess it's just a lesson that buying fancy suspension isn't necessarily a benefit, unless it's specifically dialed in for your use case.
What fancy suspenders give you that stock doesn't,is adjustability and choice. Your gear will allow you to have a setting for fast stuff and one for slower street riding,more biased toward comfort. There are compromise settings,of course,but well,they are usually a halfway house that does neither well.

Having said that,I find the K-tech forks don't really come into their own until the pace goes up,then they work so well I don't even notice them any more.
 

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The old school way of setting up suspension was that stiff, unforgiving feeling. For me, it never made much sense. I havent been to a racetrack that had potholes and railroad tracks to cross.

I installed Traxxion Dynamics AK20 fork cartridges and a Penske double shock. It has every adjustment possible, including shock length.

For sure you can set it all up to where you get the stiff, unforgive ride, but if you stay with their recommended settings, the ride is very plush. Much more comfortable than stock.

That's what you are paying the high dollars for. Or should be paying for. The ability for it to be soft and plush and at the SAME time, its controlling the bike. With stock suspension, choosing a soft ride means you give up the chassis control. You wont have to do that with well set up aftermarket pieces.

The "stiff is better" is pretty easy to see. Look at the zx14 frame, or a first generation zx10. Now compare that frame to a modern h2, zx10, or even our ninja/z1000.

The suspension ideas have changed in the same way that the frame design has.
The zx14 frame is built like a bridge and doesnt flex.
 
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