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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering what pressure you guys run on your tires? Also for the guys that drag knees or just have a really low lean do you run a lower tire pressure?
 

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I always assumed if you where knee dragging you needed not just tire pressure but tires that will accomidate this. I am too old for this kind of activity anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I always assumed if you where knee dragging you needed not just tire pressure but tires that will accomidate this. I am too old for this kind of activity anyway.
The right tires do help a lot. But I've heard of people that would lower their tire pressures on purpose just to get that extra contact patch when they're leaning on their bike.
 

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My bike is still pretty new (2 weeks old, 403 miles) and I have the OEM tires. The manual says to run 36 psi front and 42 psi rear. Dunlop's web site says 36 / 41. I have been running about 35 front and 40-41 rear. I notice that if the bike sits in the sun and the tire pressure rises, the tires follow road imperfections and seem squirrely. That's why I have been running slightly lower pressures.
 

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The right tires do help a lot. But I've heard of people that would lower their tire pressures on purpose just to get that extra contact patch when they're leaning on their bike.
Makes sence, like all the guys who do trials riding and climb structures with special motorcycles. they run real flat to make it all stick, I was once at an event where I heard someone describing that in that sport you want the rubber to have a contact surface of a jelly dognut at all times.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Makes sence, like all the guys who do trials riding and climb structures with special motorcycles. they run real flat to make it all stick, I was once at an event where I heard someone describing that in that sport you want the rubber to have a contact surface of a jelly dognut at all times.
That pretty much describes it perfectly. hahaha
 

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I run 42/42 on my 14. I know some guys that will run lower pressures...this is a double edged sword tho. You might think it will increase grip but it will make the bike bounce more. Lighter bike/riders can run less tho. Me and that bike are on up the scales. LOL experiment a little and you will find what is best. Just don't go too low.
 

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Having pressure too low or two high is detrimental to traction. Experiment to find what is best but the last thing you want is to throw your bike into a turn and roll on the throttle and the tire step out because the pressure was wrong. Having the pressure low isn't going to cause a flat and isn't likely to let the tire come off the rim while riding either. It will, however, make the bike feel sluggish and awkward. Having the pressure too low in the front can cause headshake...pressure too low in the rear will only aggravate the situation more.


I run 42 psi front and rear...this is not an indication that it is right for you though. I have found that it works well for me. Just experiment guys and you will find what works for you. Also having the pressure too low will cause the tires to cup and that sucks!
 

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I run stock pressures - 36 front, 42 rear.

You guys running it 42/42 - be careful! That is seriously over inflating the front tire, and it will not get up to temperature as quickly as it should, and will also have less traction.

Remember - when you check your pressures, make sure the tires are cold. When they heat up, it adds approx. 10% - so, at 36psi cold, when they warm up, the are around 40psi. If youre running it at 42psi cold, then your tires are heating up and the pressure is increasing to 46.5psi!!! Hell, hit a pot hole and your tire could explode!

Just something to consider.
 

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:confused:First time I ever heard of this...And my bike calls for 42/42 cold.
Well, if it calls for 42/42, then that is fine to run. Mine calls for 36/42. I would never go as high as 42 on the front on my bike.

Nothing wrong with running recommended pressures....just dont go too much over those recommendations.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I run stock pressures - 36 front, 42 rear.

You guys running it 42/42 - be careful! That is seriously over inflating the front tire, and it will not get up to temperature as quickly as it should, and will also have less traction.

Remember - when you check your pressures, make sure the tires are cold. When they heat up, it adds approx. 10% - so, at 36psi cold, when they warm up, the are around 40psi. If youre running it at 42psi cold, then your tires are heating up and the pressure is increasing to 46.5psi!!! Hell, hit a pot hole and your tire could explode!

Just something to consider.
Never thought about that. Now that I think about it I measured my tire pressure so many times when the tires were all warmed up already....
 

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Going by the bike manufacturers specs for the OEM tires is not a good idea after you have fitted aftermarket tires. The new tires could be designed/recommended to run at different pressures than the others. Also you increase pressure with weight. (2 up, luggage)

I have hit potholes and never blown a tire. Running with pressure too high will simply wear out the middle faster and can affect handling.
 

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I had a 91 CBR600F2 and was running the recommended pressures back in the day, and on the way home from the Watkins Glen track, I hit a pot hole hard enough to bend the rim but the tire never popped or lost air. I think still have the old rim in the back of the shop. I lucked out for sure.......
 

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i run 36 psi in the front, 38 psi in the rear. i mostly ride solo but dont change it when my wife rides on the back because she only weighs 100 lbs.
 

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Going by the bike manufacturers specs for the OEM tires is not a good idea after you have fitted aftermarket tires. The new tires could be designed/recommended to run at different pressures than the others. Also you increase pressure with weight. (2 up, luggage)
There is a lot of truth to this. I learned from a few factory tire reps and even one particular bike manufacturer (he'll remain nameless) that OEM tires are different beast than off the rack tires.

If you look at the sidewalls of a tire that came with the bike, there is a modifying letter at the end of the tire model. That letter designates the bike manufacturer or one of their models. These tires are specifically designed for that model and the differences may not be apparent in the tread design. Usually the difference in the the construction under the rubber. They make carcass changes in regards to a load rating, cross section profile and sometimes compound.

An example is the stock Bridgestone BT016 on the Ninja 1000. The cross section shape and circumference are different from the off-the rack version. It is also a single compound instead of a 3 zone design. It is also one load rating higher than off the rack. This is one of over a hundred tires that are like this.

Because of these differences, the pressures recommended in the manual do not apply to an off the shelf replacement tire.

Also, the Kawasaki manual does not distinguish between recommended solo, 2 up and 2 up with luggage pressures. The 36/42 stated in the manual is absolutley ridiculous, even for my 220 lbs. There's basically no contact patch at that high pressure.

I run 33 and 38 to support me properly.

On a 120/70-17, 1 psi more will support 25 more pounds. 1 psi less will support 20 lbs less.

On a 190/50-17, 1 psi more will support 20 more pounds. 1 psi less will support 18 less pounds.

The change is 1 psi increments isn't a linear scale. It's parabolic.

I use my years of racing experience and carcass temperature readings to arrive at what is correct for me.

Just keep in mind that too low, the carcass will flex too much and risk separation or breakage of the cords. Before that happens, it will just be too squirmy and unstable.

Too high, little to no contact patch, longer to heat to operating temp and excessive wear in the center causing the tire to square off instead of wear evenly.
 

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i run 36 psi in the front, 38 psi in the rear. i mostly ride solo but dont change it when my wife rides on the back because she only weighs 100 lbs.
Shoot, at that weight, have her ride in front. Tell her you're trying to centralize the mass. When in reality, you... oh never mind.:D
 
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