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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,
I am a relatively new rider, I ride for about 1 year and the last bike I owned was KTM RC 390.
I feel like its a waste to buy z800(because I am not an experienced rider)
because the price differences between the z800 and the z1000 is really low in my country.
My question is: can I restrict the throttle on a z1000? I haven't found any info about that.
Thank you in advance.
 

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The Z800 is a Bike for Cripples, Retards & Losers.

They look cheap & nasty.

Just like the 900.

If the price difference is so low, buy a 1000.

You can kill yourself on a 50cc.

I vitro posted a great image, I have to find it.
 

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I had to reread your post to decipher what you mean.

The third time I am still confused.

How about restricting the throttle with that highly calibrated system you use for turning door knobs, writing a note, trying your shoelaces;

Your right hand ...
 

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I agree with Dr.....if you are not competent to control the throttle, there is no bike in the world that small enough, and low powered enough to save you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I had to reread your post to decipher what you mean.

The third time I am still confused.

How about restricting the throttle with that highly calibrated system you use for turning door knobs, writing a note, trying your shoelaces;

Your right hand ...
Have you ever heard the quote "Silence is golden"?
Instead of being sarcastic like a 12 year old, you better not answer if you didn't understand what I wanted, which was really simple, I am not experienced enough to ride a full power z1000 so if anyone knows how can I restrict the throttle on a fuel injection motorcycle(z1000) because there is only information on the internet on how to restrict carb motorcycles.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I agree with Dr.....if you are not competent to control the throttle, there is no bike in the world that small enough, and low powered enough to save you.
the amount of smart asses on this forum is unbeliveable..
In my country we have 3 degrees of motorcycle licenses 50cc max, 500cc max, and unrestricted,
I just passed my unrestricted license and I dont want to buy a z800 because of the price differences,
restricting the throttle is the equivalent of flashing the ECU to less power but its cheaper..
So if any one who actually knows a thing or two about motorcycle can answer this question ill be grateful.
 

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Don't know of a way to de-tune a fuel injected motor as large as a 1000. It'd probably do more harm than good to it in the long run by fouling plugs constantly and gunking up the motor. My advice would be to get a smaller in line 4 motor (like an older ZZR600) for the time being and get familiar with it (Unless you really want the "naked" look then the z800 wouldn't be bad). Then stepping up to a liter bike when you feel comfortable. After all, you've only got 1 year experience and moving up to a liter bike already may only intimidate you and hinder learning. I've been in the MC biz for a few decades now and I can tell you from my observations that going too BIG too fast can be costly, even tragic. Don't care what others think about what you ride and have fun!
 

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Put a 16T sprocket up front and a 38T sprocket in the rear. You will essentially make the bike so long geared that it will feel pretty gutless, similar to a 500cc parallel twin with a 5-speed.

People don't really restrict bikes in the manner that you described. It can be done via a fueling and timing controllers, similar to how the A2 restrictions are done in Europe, but DynoJet the company that makes these devices for the Z1000 doesn't have map that lowers power, only ones that increase it. You will need to find a tuner in your country that knows how to rewrite the tables to restrict timing and fueling without damaging the bike. A fuel and timing controller is around $700 USD
 

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Yes, I was enjoying a rare moment of Sarcasm versus my typical HHelpfulness.

But you weren't clear on your question, didn't share the License Class info & you don't ask questions about becoming a Sumo Wrestler at 150 lbs wet, fully grown with a background in Ballet.

You live in Israel, you have some really fast roads & some bad ones with an under 500cc choice or Over, for Licensing.

You are going to break the Speed Limits on a 125 - 250 anyway.

Plus you are a relatively new rider unless you have some dirt bike experience.

The issue with big road bikes is that unlike a dirt bike you reach very high speeds, in seconds, you cannot throw the bike around & you have to be committed in corners & lines, etc & then there is the issue of other vehicles on the road - the straights are easy.

The beauty of a 250 or a 400 is that you are getting the motorcycle experience, the bikes are easy to flick around in comparison but it takes so much longer & with more effort to get to high speeds so there is much more time to make corrections on the way & especially in corners, rough roads & blissfully unaware traffic.

Buy a Z400 used if you think you will want to upgrade in short time.

Or new & keep the 400 for a few years.

Or bite the bullet & get the 800 but you should learn all this from local test rides at the dealership.

A Z1000 is a big bike, its not designed to be detuned or run with super high gearing, I went 1/One then 2/Two upfront & 2/Two down on the rear - suddenly I could do 192* mph in a straight without vibration but the Spirit of the bike was lost.

I haven't ridden the 2017-2021 Z1000 because they don't sell them in the USA but I know why I purchased mine when I shouldn't be riding - because of the feeling that only the Marriage of a 1000cc motor & the Z superimposes on your Soul.

The newer Z's from 125 up don't have the same Charisma or Beauty, they look cheap.

The Z1000 is not a true sports bike without adding a new rear shock & some fine tuning - instead its a Beast, that exudes Raw Power & Next Century styling with a Soulful feeling no other bike can impart ...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Don't know of a way to de-tune a fuel injected motor as large as a 1000. It'd probably do more harm than good to it in the long run by fouling plugs constantly and gunking up the motor. My advice would be to get a smaller in line 4 motor (like an older ZZR600) for the time being and get familiar with it (Unless you really want the "naked" look then the z800 wouldn't be bad). Then stepping up to a liter bike when you feel comfortable. After all, you've only got 1 year experience and moving up to a liter bike already may only intimidate you and hinder learning. I've been in the MC biz for a few decades now and I can tell you from my observations that going too BIG too fast can be costly, even tragic. Don't care what others think about what you ride and have fun!
Thank you for you advice, I guess buying a 1000cc right now is not the smartest move.
My view was purely about saving money and staying with one bike for a very very long time,
but it seems inevitable to buy an "in between" bike to grow into the bigger ones the correct and of course
enjoyable way.
Put a 16T sprocket up front and a 38T sprocket in the rear. You will essentially make the bike so long geared that it will feel pretty gutless, similar to a 500cc parallel twin with a 5-speed.

People don't really restrict bikes in the manner that you described. It can be done via a fueling and timing controllers, similar to how the A2 restrictions are done in Europe, but DynoJet the company that makes these devices for the Z1000 doesn't have map that lowers power, only ones that increase it. You will need to find a tuner in your country that knows how to rewrite the tables to restrict timing and fueling without damaging the bike. A fuel and timing controller is around $700 USD
As Dr said doing so(changing the sprockets) will defeat the purpose of the bike,
I will have to buy a smaller bike to better learn on it because after all nothing can mitigate the lack of experience,
I guess I just needed a reminder of that.
Thank you for your comment, much appreciated.

Yes, I was enjoying a rare moment of Sarcasm versus my typical HHelpfulness.

But you weren't clear on your question, didn't share the License Class info & you don't ask questions about becoming a Sumo Wrestler at 150 lbs wet, fully grown with a background in Ballet.

You live in Israel, you have some really fast roads & some bad ones with an under 500cc choice or Over, for Licensing.

You are going to break the Speed Limits on a 125 - 250 anyway.

Plus you are a relatively new rider unless you have some dirt bike experience.

The issue with big road bikes is that unlike a dirt bike you reach very high speeds, in seconds, you cannot throw the bike around & you have to be committed in corners & lines, etc & then there is the issue of other vehicles on the road - the straights are easy.

The beauty of a 250 or a 400 is that you are getting the motorcycle experience, the bikes are easy to flick around in comparison but it takes so much longer & with more effort to get to high speeds so there is much more time to make corrections on the way & especially in corners, rough roads & blissfully unaware traffic.

Buy a Z400 used if you think you will want to upgrade in short time.

Or new & keep the 400 for a few years.

Or bite the bullet & get the 800 but you should learn all this from local test rides at the dealership.

A Z1000 is a big bike, its not designed to be detuned or run with super high gearing, I went 1/One then 2/Two upfront & 2/Two down on the rear - suddenly I could do 192* mph in a straight without vibration but the Spirit of the bike was lost.

I haven't ridden the 2017-2021 Z1000 because they don't sell them in the USA but I know why I purchased mine when I shouldn't be riding - because of the feeling that only the Marriage of a 1000cc motor & the Z superimposes on your Soul.

The newer Z's from 125 up don't have the same Charisma or Beauty, they look cheap.

The Z1000 is not a true sports bike without adding a new rear shock & some fine tuning - instead its a Beast, that exudes Raw Power & Next Century styling with a Soulful feeling no other bike can impart ...
Points were taken with your metaphor.
Dirt bikes and street bikes indeed are very different, I will have to climb my way up to the z1000, its going to be more enjoyable and appreciable that way.
Thank you for your time and advice.
 

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Our pleasure in that I speak for everyone.

Riding a dirt bike & crashing as you improve, instills so much motor learning & builds confidence.

Simple lessons like being able to redirect one's focus is critical - many accidents can be avoided if one has that skill, so many riders commit & then a car, animal or a corner arrives & rider's get locked up visually & hit exactly what they fixated upon & could have avoided.

Riding dirt fast trains that as you are always being forced by the terrain into picking new lines.

What about a hybrid bike?

In a year of riding trails, tracks & some pavement you would know where you want to be ownership wise.

You do have a lot of good trails there for a small country.

Street bikes are not designed to be crashed.

You could buy a beater but I do know bikes are expensive there.

I have been riding since I was 10, now 58 with many, many injuries from bikes & working in places like Israel.

The Z1000 is my dream bike & my particular bike is designed just as I wanted but its my last bike.

The other consideration when riding big bikes either the 800 or 1000 (even a 250 or 400 road bike), is being fully kitted out everytime you spontaneously feel like going for a ride - this is first a sizable investment in gear (I don't wear leathers), & is a 5-10 minute minimum process.

The one time this year I slowly cruised to & from a local market 80 seconds away during Covid 19 without my gear I got sideswiped - lost a lot of deep road rash, two broken toes, dislocated finger or one hand & badly sprained finger on the other & I was lucky.

If you commit to a big bike, you have to commit to suiting up.

The only bike that would excite me enough after my Z would be an H2 & in Truth, those days & that kind of riding, are beyond me.

By the same token, you can have so much more fun riding a 125, 250 or even a 500cc trail/hybrid bike that is road legal with your friends than blowing everyone out of the water on a Z1000 ...

Case in point, this was my first road legal bike in NZ that I bought at Xmas, 16 years of age, a Suzuki TC* 125.

It had Points that constantly needed adjustment & a self mixing oil two stroke motor.

I had so much fun riding this, on the road & the dirt with my Ten Mates on Honda XL 125, Yamaha DT 125, etc.

I thought I was Evel Knievel until the Arms War started & someone bought a 250 & then another bought a 400 & then it was all on every six months to a year scraping up enough money to stay with the pack until everyone was riding Yamaha 465's, Suzuki PE 400's, TT 500's, XR500R's, etc.

Lots of injuries all around but nothing too serious versus high speed road bike impacts where you were either dead or wished you were during months & years of rehab.

If you are going to get a road bike, get the 400 used with low miles or a much older bike that has been scraped up but ridden with a similar engine under 500.

There is nothing worse than buying a smaller bike & wishing you had the bigger version in places where the larger engine is dominant.

By the way, most new bike owners damage the fairings & cases not riding the bike but slipping when parking or cleaning the bike - I had a rare Suzuki Katana 750 when I was 19 in NZ, cleaned the bike & then slipped over in the driveway & crushed $2000 worth of fairings (before the internet).

lj0617-284135_2.jpg
Katana_400_2-730x548.jpg
fbb9d13eb99c2d405842e6e07fffba1d.jpg
 

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No, heres the deal. You asked a bad/ dangerous question question, and Dr and I gave you an honest answer.

You asked something like, "Dad is there a way for me to play with a spitting Cobra? I REALLY want to play with one."
 

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If you can ride an RC 390 well (they are great sport bikes), then you should be able to handle the 1000. If not then stick with the 390.
 

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Yahav,

Last night very late I was riding Sunset Blvd in Los Angeles & demoralizing all the wanna be car racers until I was swarmed by 25 plus Bees, more like Hornets.

It was all these young kids racing on tricked out Honda 125 Groms & some modified mini Italian bikes, it smelt like some were using race gas - they were so noisy it was unbelievable & everyone was revving their engines.

But they were having so much fun but were completely reckless, going through red lights, etc.

Flying from the green lights & sliding full brakes into some of the reds, everyone trying to out perform the others.

The lights are crippled presently by the Mayor Major Dickhead Garcetti to stop people racing during Covid with lots of short runs.

A couple of lights I blew them out of the water but it was very difficult because I was afraid I would run over them as they left so much easier than I & I didn't know the pecking order of the riders.

It was Insane.

They were more dangerous than a 1000cc bike but they were having the time of their lives.

In the end I just sat at the back like a Mother Hen with the guys that were wherlstanding.

Bottom line;

You can kill yourself on a 50cc bike.

You can have a blast on a 125-400cc bike.

Riding a 800 or a 1000 is very close notwithstanding the 1000cc has no electronic traction & riding modes.

I concur with Jimz, if you have spent a year on a RC390 which is faster & more nimble than the Z400, you can graduate to an 800 or a 1000cc.

But each step up, is a progression in difficulty & commitment.

If I lived in Israel, I would be happy with the RC390.

But if a Z1000 was very close to the price of a Z800, the Z1000 would be my choice.

Is there a reason why you asked such a question beyond what's apparent ie; did you have some accidents already?
 

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Disregard what the "Doctor" said. With ALL bikes the ultimate control is between your ears and your right wrist.
You can kill yourself on a 50 cc bike. I ride a 1400cc and, unless you mash the throttle, it's very docile. Weight will be the bigger issue.

Mad
 

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You can kill yourself on a 50 cc bike. I ride a 1400cc and, unless you mash the throttle, it's very docile. Weight will be the bigger issue.
Totally agree! A kid we used to race with never got a scratch on the track. One day screwing around on his pit bike (one of those cheep Chinese 50cc gimmicks you used to get at AutoZone) popped a wheelie in the pits with no helmet fell back and hit his head... Dead! This was in Mexico so I'm not sure if they were far from the hospital or just poor medical care/ facilities, what have you, but carelessness will usually cost you...
 

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Maddevil,

On two posts in my response I made clear reference to the facts that;

Bottom line;

You can kill yourself on a 50cc bike.

You can have a blast on a 125-400cc bike.

I want the guy to enjoy the right bike for him & if he invested a year on a RC390, he has earned his Flying Wings.


I worked a lot in the Middle East & Israel, you have some great roads & then some very difficult ones.

There is usually deeper reasons why someone would ask such a question.
 

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Hey,
I am a relatively new rider, I ride for about 1 year and the last bike I owned was KTM RC 390.
I feel like its a waste to buy z800(because I am not an experienced rider)
because the price differences between the z800 and the z1000 is really low in my country.
My question is: can I restrict the throttle on a z1000? I haven't found any info about that.
Thank you in advance.
no need to do that just take it easy and learn the bike you’ll be just fine, as time goes you’ll be riding the machine like you stole it. Just takes time and repetition that’s all and also some discipline of course and that’s with any bike
 
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