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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon,
I have decided to replace a front rotor that appears to be warped. I have a replacement rotor and wanted to know if someone had a video or guide how to replace the front rotor. Specifically, I just installed new pads and fluid (which didn't fix my pulsing problem) and wanted to know if I'm going to have to complete that process again. Thanks and have a great Memorial Day weekend.
 

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nothing special to it, just clean off the loctite from both the screw and hole by running a tap and die through both. It's an M8x1.25 thread pitch. Then reapply the loctite (typically red for discs, but blue is fine too), and torque to 27nm.
 

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use the high temp loctight. red i believe. brake systems can reach some very high heat temperatures so that’s why i like the high temp loctight. usually i put down a bead of the glue vertically along the side of the bolt threads. do you have the service manual? if not click on the link below and read up on the brake chapter. make sure to wipe down the new rotors with brake cleaner and cloth. they usually have an oil on them from the factory when new.


for the gen 4

85742
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the information. I have a front stand and I will look at the link for the manual. I guess my biggest concern is putting the wheel back on after installation. I believe it's not a good idea to compress the caliper without opening the brake bleed valve so the fluid goes out instead of reversing through the line. Is that correct? Then it's a matter of topping off the reservoir, correct? Thank you. I'm learning...
 

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No, dont open the bleed valve. Use a piece of plastic to separate the pads. A screwdriver will work, but I like plastic as it doesnt leave a mark on the pads.

Just push the pistons back into the caliper. As you do this, fluid goes up into the reservoir. Do make sure it doesnt overflow and drip fluid on to your bike. Honestly, this is an excellent technique to use during a brake bleed. It wont hurt anything. Just make sure it doesnt overflow.

I suspect you have been using poor pads...stock ebc, galfer like. These pads are meant more for long life rather than performance. Over time, they pad material builds up on the brake rotor. It does it in an uneven manner. This is where your pulsing comes from. A bent, or warped rotor doesnt cause pulsing. It will in our cars, but our motorcycle calipers are different.

Let's say the rotor is bent. What youll notice is this rotor will push the pads back into the caliper. Your problem will be excessive lever travel, but the brake will work just fine. Strange, but true. I've used rotors that had a full millimeter of bend to them. Lots of lever travel, but the rotor worked until it could be replaced.

Unless you are going to buy new rotors, you can probably fix the one you have. Find some sandpaper. 200 grit, 300 grit like. Use it to clean the rotor surface. Do both sides, obviously. The rotor material is so hard, you wont actually remove material from it. You will end up removing the old pad material. After you do this, put in a set of good pads.....DP, Brembo, CL, Vesrah....something like that. No stock, no galfer, no ebc. Once you clean the surface and install those pads, your braking will be better than new.

People often times clean the bobbins to try and help this situation. This doesnt do much, if anything. There are full floating rotors. Thise do depend on the bobbins being clean, to a small extent. Ours are not like that. Our are used more for expansion when the rotors get hot. Usually when people clean bobbins, they also clean the rotors surface. This is what fixes the rotor. Not the bobbin cleaning.
 

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Thanks for the information. I have a front stand and I will look at the link for the manual. I guess my biggest concern is putting the wheel back on after installation. I believe it's not a good idea to compress the caliper without opening the brake bleed valve so the fluid goes out instead of reversing through the line. Is that correct? Then it's a matter of topping off the reservoir, correct? Thank you. I'm learning...
just one other thing I want to add that wasn't discussed; I generally clean the brake dust off the pistons before I push them back in so that I don't push pad material into and beyond the piston seals. It's usually what makes the pistons stick and the pad wear unevenly. Brakecleen and a toothbrush does the job.

Also the harbor freight trim popper tool makes for a wonderful caliper compressor, it's got a flat surface so it doesn't damage the pad. I love this thing!

 

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Yes, for sure. That's a huge miss on my part. Old toothbrushes work well for the piston cleaning. Or, use one of the kids brushes. They wont know the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fantastic help gang. I went through the process of sanding the rotors (and brushing the caliper pistons with brake clean) before installing new pads. I was really hopeful but it didn't help at all. When I measured run out, one rotor showed more motion (not much) than the other so I'm thinking it's enough to cause a problem. I don't have the best luck diagnosing issues. I usually get it right on the 15th try. haha. I hope you have a great Memorial Day weekend. It's raining here so, it might be a good opportunity to work on the bike.
 

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what year bike do you have, I have stock 3rd gen discs with 9k miles on them, perfectly straight and smooth as glass, $80 bux and you can have the pair
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sorry for the delay. My bike is 2003. It only has 7500 miles which confuses me why the disc could be warped. I ordered one from ebay with assurances it was straight. We shall see. Thanks again.
 

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Sorry for the delay. My bike is 2003. It only has 7500 miles which confuses me why the disc could be warped. I ordered one from ebay with assurances it was straight. We shall see. Thanks again.
OK, your's is a 1st gen and those have unique discs, while all other Z1000's 2nd gen through 4th gen (2007-2021) all use the same bolt pattern discs, so yeah mine wouldn't have worked anyways....
 

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Sorry for the delay. My bike is 2003. It only has 7500 miles which confuses me why the disc could be warped. I ordered one from ebay with assurances it was straight. We shall see. Thanks again.
usually it is extreme heat that “warps” the rotor. not in the sense that it bends the metal so much, although that can happen, as it creates uneven wear spots on the disk. could also come from worn out wheel bearings.

 
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